My blog about application development on the .NET platform.

Using the event aggregator pattern to communicate between view models

If you are developing a composite user interface that contains several parts that need to be synchronized with each other, you need to be able to communicate between these different parts of your application.

This can be done using ordinary .NET events or by keeping a direct reference to each subscriber from each publisher class and simply call a method on the subscriber class from the publisher class once you want to publish some information. However, using this approach will result in a tight coupling between publishers and subscribers that makes the application harder to maintain. It could potentially also lead to memory leaks if a publisher of an event lives longer than a subscriber and you forget to, or don’t know when to, unsubscribe from an event.
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Implement a MVVM loading dialog in WPF

Continuing from my last post about how to display dialogs to the user in a MVVM WPF application using Prism without breaking the pattern, this one is about how you can extend the built-in functionality to implement a loading dialog to be shown to the user while running a background operation.
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Implement a confirmation dialog in WPF using MVVM and Prism

If you are serious about implementing the MVVM pattern in your UI applications you should be well aware of the fact that any call you make to System.Windows.MessageBox.Show from your view models violates this pattern and the separation of concerns that exists between the application’s logic and its presentation.

By honoring the MVVM design pattern and its principles your application is likely to require less effort when you make changes in one area or another as the presentation layer (the view), the presentation logic layer (the view model) and the business model layer (model) are decoupled from each other. Other benefits include testability and the fact that designers and developers can work concurrently and independently.
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